Campfire classic - KXNet.com - Bismarck/Minot/Williston/Dickinson-KXNEWS,ND

Campfire classic

Updated: Aug 1, 2013 03:58 PM
© Michael Kraus / Bonnier © Michael Kraus / Bonnier
  • Past stories from SaveurMore>>

  • Crawfish: Born on the Bayou

    Crawfish: Born on the Bayou

    Called both crayfish and crawfish, these tiny freshwater cousins to lobsters are firm and sweet. Plunged into boiling water, they cook through in just two minutes and easily soak up any seasonings, from classic Cajun spices to Asian-style ginger and garlic.
    Called both crayfish and crawfish, these tiny freshwater cousins to lobsters are firm and sweet. Plunged into boiling water, they cook through in just two minutes and easily soak up any seasonings, from classic Cajun spices to Asian-style ginger and garlic.
  • Fabled feta cheese

    Fabled feta cheese

    Just a crumble of feta's pungent, salty flavor enhances dishes from stuffed peppers to salads to savory tarts.
    Just a crumble of feta's pungent, salty flavor enhances dishes from stuffed peppers to salads to savory tarts.
  • The pasta lesson: Making orecchiette in Puglia

    The pasta lesson: Making orecchiette in Puglia

    While most of Italy embraces pasta, Puglia takes that love even further.
    While most of Italy embraces pasta, Puglia takes that love even further.


By Samira Kawash

 

Among my favorite things about being a Girl Scout in the 1970s were the campfires our troop leaders would host on cool summer evenings.


I remember how they would send us out into the woods to scavenge for sticks that we would later use to toast fluffy marshmallows. Once their snow-white skins turned golden brown and their insides gooey, we'd sandwich them together with chocolate bars between graham crackers and devour the luscious fire-kissed confections known as s'mores.


The s'more, short for "some more," first appeared as a recipe in a 1927 Girl Scouts handbook. Yet, as I discovered while researching my forthcoming book, Candy: A Century of Panic and Pleasure (Faber and Faber, 2013), its real history unfolded indoors in the 1880s, when Americans started toasting marshmallows over oil lamps, fireplaces, even simple candle flames.


The combination of flavors we now associate with s'mores appeared decades later, when bakers and confectioners started offering chocolate-dipped marshmallows in their stores. Soon after, they placed those chocolaty marshmallows atop sweet cookies to create such treats as Mallomars (1913) and Moon Pies (1917), both of which are akin to s'mores turned inside out.


The Girl Scouts adapted the s'more to campfires, using tidy chocolate bars that melted magically against the marshmallows. Graham crackers were sturdy enough to sandwich the two.


I've always loved how the Scouts' recipe ends: "Though it tastes like 'some more,' one is really enough." Good advice, yes. But remembering those campfires of my youth, I realize that one s'more is never enough.


See Saveur's Ultimate S'more recipe »



© 2013 SAVEUR
All rights reserved.
*DISCLAIMER*: The information contained in or provided through this site section is intended for general consumer understanding and education only and is not intended to be and is not a substitute for professional advice. Use of this site section and any information contained on or provided through this site section is at your own risk and any information contained on or provided through this site section is provided on an "as is" basis without any representations or warranties.
Powered by WorldNow
General information or questions:
kxinfo@kxnet.com

News:
Bismarck:
Phone: 701-223-9197
News Fax: 701-223-1985

News:
Minot:
Phone: 701-852-2104
News Fax: 701-838-1050
All content © Copyright 2000 - 2014 WorldNow and KXNET. All Rights Reserved.
For more information on this site, please read our Privacy Policy and Terms of Service.