Foods4BetterHealth Reports on Study Outlining Dangers of Salt for Diabetics - KXNet.com - Bismarck/Minot/Williston/Dickinson-KXNEWS,ND

Foods4BetterHealth Reports on Study Outlining Dangers of Salt for Diabetics

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Foods4BetterHealth reports on a study detailing the dangers too much salt pose to those suffering from diabetes.

Boston, MA, United States – August 11, 2014 /MarketersMedia/ –

Foods4BetterHealth (Foods4BetterHealth.com), a food and nutrition web site that promotes healthy foods to prevent disease and illness, is reporting on a study that has shown how too much salt can double the risk of heart disease for diabetics.

The Foods4BetterHealth report (http://www.foods4betterhealth.com/diabetics-high-salt-diet-doubles-risk-of-heart-disease-11380) says sodium is a much bigger issue for people who have a chronic disease, mainly those who have type 2 diabetes. Those with type 2 diabetes were found to have double the risk of cardiovascular disease.

The Foods4BetterHealth article “Diabetics: High-Salt Diet Doubles Risk of Heart Disease,” explains that this new study, conducted in Japan, looked at 1,588 adults aged 40 to 70 who were diagnosed with diabetes. The participants were divided into four groups based on the amounts of daily sodium they consumed and matched with the estimated risk of experiencing cardiovascular complications.

The Foods4BetterHealth report explains that the study, published in the Endocrine Society’s Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism, assessed the participants with questionnaires regarding eating habits, including sodium intake and the rate of cardiovascular complications over an eight-year follow-up period. (Source: Horiakwa, C., et al., “Dietary Sodium Intake and Incidence of Diabetes Complications in Japanese Patients with Type 2 Diabetes – Analysis of the Japan Diabetes Complications Study,” The Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism 2014; doi: 10.1210/jc.2013-4315; http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25050990.)

The Foods4BetterHealth article reports that the study revealed that those people who consumed 5.9 grams of sodium daily developed twice the risk of experiencing cardiovascular complications, compared to those participants who consumed 2.8 grams of sodium daily. Those who consumed the most sodium also had a greater degree of poor blood sugar control than those who ate the least amount of sodium.

“My thoughts regarding this study are that 2.8 grams per day of sodium is still far too high and greatly exceeds recommended values for sodium intake,” says Dr. Kevin McLaughlin, health and wellness specialist for Foods4BetterHealth.

The Foods4BetterHealth report observes that if the lower sodium consumption participants had the recommended daily limit for sodium, 1.5 to 1.8 g, they may have enjoyed a much greater benefit compared to those who consumed the highest amounts of sodium.

The Foods4BetterHealth article concludes by stating this study underscores the need for a reduced consumption of sodium in type 2 diabetics.

Foods4BetterHealth.com, created by Doctors Health Press, is a food news and health website that offers readers information about the latest food controversies, exclusive expert advice and health tips to ward off illness, prevent disease, and live a long, healthy life. For more information, visit www.Foods4BetterHealth.com.

For more information about us, please visit http://www.foods4betterhealth.com/

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Email: press@lombardipublishing.com
Address: 60 State Street, Suite 700, Boston, MA 02109-1894
Phone: 1-866-744-3579
Organization: Doctors Health Press, Inc

Source: http://marketersmedia.com/foods4betterhealth-reports-on-study-outlining-dangers-of-salt-for-diabetics/58759

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