US blocks goods from companies suspected of forced labor

FILE – In this Dec. 5, 2018, file photo, residents pass by the entrance to the “Hotan City apparel employment training base” where Hetian Taida Apparel Co. has a factory in Hotan in western China’s Xinjiang region. The Trump administration on Tuesday, Oct. 1, 2019, announced it is stopping imports of clothing, gold, diamonds and other items believed to have been produced with forced labor by companies based in Brazil, China and Malaysia as well as some gold mined in eastern Congo and diamonds from a region in Zimbabwe. Hetian Taida Apparel Co., Ltd. in Xinjiang, is one of the companies sanctioned. (AP Photo/Ng Han Guan, File)

This is an archived article and the information in the article may be outdated. Please look at the time stamp on the story to see when it was last updated.

WASHINGTON (AP) — The Trump administration on Tuesday announced it is holding imports of clothing, gold, diamonds and other items believed to have been produced with forced labor by companies based in Brazil, China and Malaysia as well as some gold mined in eastern Congo and diamonds from a region in Zimbabwe.

An official at U.S. Customs and Border Protection, Brenda Smith, said her agency issued orders to immediately detain the goods at U.S. ports of entry for further investigation. The move comes amid a wide-ranging trade dispute between the U.S. and China, which has led to new tariffs on hundreds of billions of dollars’ worth of goods.

Smith says the “message here is that one of the ways the U.S. and China can collaborate together is to ensure that forced labor is not used.”

She said the companies can re-export the detained shipments or submit information to show they’re legal.

The companies sanctioned are Bonechar Carvão Ativado Do Brasil Ltda; Hetian Taida Apparel Co., Ltd. in Xinjiang, China and WRP Asia Pacific Sdn. Bhd. in Malaysia. The action also covers gold mined at small artisan mines in eastern Congo and rough diamonds from the Marange diamond fields in Zimbabwe.

Zimbabwe’s government in a statement called the U.S. decision “a blatant and shameless lie.” The Marange region was in the spotlight a decade ago over alleged army killings of artisanal miners and forced labor. The fields are now commercially mined.

___

This story has been updated to correct that Zimbabwe action is against a region, not a company.

Copyright 2021 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.

Recent Videos

Wednesday, January 27th, 2021 - KX Storm Team Evening Forecast - Dave Holder

NDC JAN 27 2ND HR

United Tribes Basketball

WDA Hockey

WDA Basketball

Class B Basketball

SNAP increase

Fire & COVID-19

GoPro found after 6 years at the bottom of Honolulu ocean returned to owner

Local Election Parties

Vaccine Debate

DAPL Appeal

KX Convo: Sen. Kevin Cramer

Winter Driving Reminders

Chocolates for Shopping

Firefighter Competition

Memory Bears

KX Storm Team Full Evening Forecast w/Tom Schrader 1/26

Weather Zoom

More Video

Don't Miss

More Don't Miss

KX News Trending Stories