Robert Mueller submits Russia report: FBI investigation into Russian meddling concludes

National News
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FILE – In this June 21, 2017 file photo, former FBI Director Robert Mueller, the special counsel probing Russian interference in the 2016 election, arrives on Capitol Hill for a closed door meeting before the Senate Judiciary Committee in Washington. U.S. special counsel Robert Mueller has yet to release his report about alleged Russian meddling […]

Special Counsel Robert Mueller’s long-awaited report on his findings of the over two-year-long investigation into any ties between the Russian government and Trump campaign associates, as well as any matters that arose from the investigation, has been submitted to the attorney general, William Barr.

Barr will now summarize it for lawmakers, in accordance with the law governing the special counsel. It is not clear whether the report or any part of it will be made public — that’s left to Barr’s discretion.

President Trump has said he looks forward to the release of Mueller’s findings and opined that they should be made public upon their release.

“Let it come out, let people see it… and we’ll see what happens,” Mr. Trump told reporters at the White House Wednesday.

The president previously said it is “totally up to” Attorney General William Barr whether and when the special counsel’s report is released.

Attorneys depart Mueller’s team in advance of report dropping

Multiple prosecutors on Mueller’s team of attorneys in the special counsel’s office have been announcing their departures in recent weeks, signaling that the investigation was winding down.

Special counsel spokesperson Peter Carr confirmed to CBS News this week that Zainab Ahmad, a top terrorism prosecutor, concluded her detail with the special counsel’s office. Lead special counsel prosecutor Andrew Weissmann’s departure from the team was also reported by CBS to be imminent.

 

House voted for a public release of the report, Senate blocked it

The House of Representatives voted to pass a non-binding resolution in mid-March, calling for the public release of special counsel Robert Mueller’s final report into the FBI’s investigation into Russian interference in the 2016 election, but Sen. Lindsey Graham, South Carolina Republican, blocked the vote in the Senate.

Senate Minority Leader Charles Schumer, of New York, called for unanimous consent on the resolution, which had passed the House in a 420-0 vote. However, Graham objected after Schumer refused to amend the resolution to include a provision on appointing a special counsel to investigate misconduct at the Justice Department related to the FISA warrant against former Trump campaign official Carter Page.

“Was there two systems of justice in 2016? One for the Democratic candidate and one for the Republican candidate?” Graham asked on the Senate floor.

Currently, Mueller’s probe has yielded seven guilty pleas and 99.5 months in prison served, and 34 individuals and three separate companies have been charged.

President Trump’s former campaign manager, Paul Manafort, was one of the first Trump associates to serve time in prison as part of Mueller’s probe. Manafort was indicted on a total of 25 counts in two jurisdictions. The charges ranged from conspiracy to launder money to act as an unregistered agent of a foreign principal.

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