It’s always nice to enjoy a long holiday weekend. However, there is a larger meaning to this holiday. It’s about more than just spending it relaxing and enjoying our time with family.

According to North Dakota Veterans Affairs, there are about 2,550 fallen heroes in the state.

There was a ceremony today honoring our fallen soldiers at the North Dakota Veterans Cemetery.

The rain and wind didn’t stop a parade of motorcycles from zipping their way to the cemetery early this morning to help honor the holiday.

“We have about five to six hundred bikes today,” said Butch Olson, a member of the Vietnam Legacy Vets Motorcycle Club.

“We’ve had close to nine hundred before, but as you can see the weather has been cooperating thankfully.”


Olson explained why this day is important to all of those who have served.

“I was in Vietnam, and to me, we have to support the military, the guys that come back and try to prevent suicide. And even though we’ve gotten out of the military, it stands strong with us,” Olson said.


“We’re always going to be military and be there for the civilians, for the Americans and for our brothers that were in the military, and sisters of course.”


Even though outside there was rain with no shine, about 1,800 people gathered around the Veterans Cemetery to remember those that have died for our freedom and be there to stand alongside those who have served and are still with us.

“As a Chaplain, I work a lot with the families of our fallen, and when a service member dies, myself or another Chaplain goes with the notification officer to tell the family of the news that their service member has died, and it’s very personal to me,” David Johnson, Chaplain for the North Dakota National Guard, explained.

“It’s important to me because they’ve served their country. They’ve served their country well, and I don’t want people to forget the great things that they have done to make us free.”

Memorial Day is more than just another day off. It’s a day to remember those who died serving our country. Fallen but never forgotten.