Archeologists unearth an ancient pharaonic city in Egypt

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An undated handout photo released Thursday, April 8, 2021 by the by the Zahi Hawass Center For Egyptology shows an archaeological discovery as part of the ‘Lost Golden City’ in Luxor, Egypt. The city is 3000 years old, dates to the reign of Amenhotep III, and continued to be used by Tutankhamun and Ay. (by the Zahi Hawass Center For Egyptology via AP)

CAIRO (AP) — Egyptian archeologists have unearthed a 3,000-year-old lost city south of Cairo, complete with mud brick houses, artifacts, and tools from pharaonic times. Noted archeologist Zahi Hawass says that an Egyptian mission discovered the mortuary city in the southern province of Luxor. It dates back to what is considered a golden era of ancient Egypt, the period under King Amenhotep III of the 18th dynasty. He said on Thursday that the city was built on the western bank of the Nile River and was once the largest administrative and industrial settlement of the pharaonic empire. Last year, archeologists started excavating in the area, searching for the mortuary temple of King Tutankhamun.

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