Which potato ricer is best?

A staple of the holiday table, fluffy mashed potatoes dripping with loads of butter aren’t as easy to create as it seems. Too often they are gluey, filled with lumps or too dense to be delicious. A potato ricer can’t solve every cooking conundrum you face when preparing a feast, but it can lighten up your potatoes.

The PriorityChef Large Potato Ricer is big enough to feed a crowd without being too large for the average-sized kitchen. It’s easy to use and great if you’re just starting to rice.

What to know before you buy a potato ricer

Size 

The potato ricer you select should be large enough to feed the people in your household but not so big that it can’t fit in your utensil drawer. Some commercial potato ricers are too large for home use, while smaller versions may not make enough potatoes to serve a crowd. 

The most versatile and convenient size is one that holds 2 cups of potatoes. 

Material

Because you need to exert substantial force to press cooked potatoes through it, look for strong materials that can take the pressure. Stainless steel is the most common, but plastic is also an option. Avoid lightweight or flimsy metals — they can dent or bend easily. 

Leverage

Work smarter, not harder. Longer handles give you more leverage and are generally easier to use. 

How to properly rice potatoes

  • Peeling potatoes is optional. If your potato skins are exceptionally dirty or very tough, you might want to peel them before cooking. 
  • Cut your potatoes into uniform sizes. This lets them cook evenly.
  • Boil the potatoes in salted water until a fork slides easily through them. Depending on how large they are, this takes 15-20 minutes.
  • Drain the potatoes. 
  • When they are hot, place them in the ricer. Do not add too many or they will ooze out of the top. 
  • Press firmly to rice your potatoes into a bowl. You may need to do this over several batches. 
  • Add whatever flavorings you choose — butter, spices, cheese — and stir gently to combine. 

What to look for in a quality potato ricer

Padded handles

Padded handles make ricing more comfortable. They’re especially important if you have arthritis or hand pain. There can be a simple rubber coating for better grip, but the best potato ricers have more padding than that.

Dishwasher-safe

Cleaning little bits of potato from tiny holes can take a long time. Look for dishwasher-safe ricers that can go directly into the top rack for easy cleaning. 

Edged notch

An edged notch on the ricing hopper rests gently on the side of the bowl you are ricing into. This provides more stability, and a bit more leverage, as you press the potatoes through.

Additional attachments

Some ricers come with additional attachments that let you choose the size of your final product. This is helpful if you want more control over the textures in your recipes.

How much you can expect to spend on a potato ricer

Depending on the capacity, construction and material, expect to spend $12-$50. 

Potato ricer FAQ

Can you use a potato ricer for anything other than mashed potatoes?

A. If you don’t like to buy kitchen tools that can only perform one function, you’re in luck. With your potato ricer you can also: 

  • Juice citrus.
  • Make egg salad.
  • Squeeze moisture from cooked greens, such as spinach.
  • Grate garlic.
  • Puree baby food.
  • Make guacamole.
  • Press chickpeas for hummus.
  • Rice other tubers (sweet potatoes, turnips, etc.).

Why should you use a potato ricer?

A. For the fluffiest, creamiest mashed potatoes, a potato ricer cannot be beat. Ricing potatoes incorporates air into them. This lightens their texture substantially. Additionally, this process eliminates lumps and creates smoother mashed potatoes.

Do some potatoes work better in a ricer?

A. This depends on what you are looking for in your final product.  Yukon Gold potatoes are good as overall mashed potatoes. Their flavor is buttery and rich. However, they are a denser, medium-starch  potato that can be difficult to rice. 

On the other hand, russet potatoes are high-starch. This starch yields a fluffier texture that works better through the ricer. Russets — also known as jacket or baking potatoes — are easier to press too.

What’s the best potato ricer to buy?

Top potato ricer

PriorityChef Large Potato Ricer

PriorityChef Large Potato Ricer

What you need to know: Long handles with silicone grips provide good leverage for ricing. 

What you’ll love: It’s made of stainless steel that’s dishwasher-safe. The 4-inch hopper is almost 3 inches deep. It resists rusting and stains, and it holds almost 2 cups of potatoes.

What you should consider: Some users wanted something that felt more substantial.

Where to buy: Sold by Amazon

Top potato ricer for the money

Oxo Good Grips Stainless Steel Potato Ricer

Oxo Good Grips Stainless Steel Potato Ricer

What you need to know: This is another high-quality tool from a trusted kitchen supplier. 

What you’ll love: It’s solid stainless steel, sturdy and easy to care for in the dishwasher. The padded handles make it easier and more comfortable to rice potatoes. It features a knob at the end of the ricer to keep it stable against a bowl.

What you should consider: The inside of the hopper has sharp edges. Be careful when cleaning by hand. 

Where to buy: Sold by Amazon and Home Depot

Worth checking out

Norpro Stainless Steel Potato Ricer

Norpro Stainless Steel Potato Ricer

What you need to know: This tool is perfect for mashing potatoes or making homemade applesauce.

What you’ll love: It’s made from stainless steel and its long handles provide good leverage. It holds nearly 3 cups of potatoes and fits easily over bowls for efficient and tidy use.

What you should consider: It must be hand-washed.

Where to buy: Sold by Amazon

 

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Suzannah Kolbeck writes for BestReviews. BestReviews has helped millions of consumers simplify their purchasing decisions, saving them time and money.

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